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Stanford: Morning Service in B flat Op.10 (Te Deum, Benedictus & Jubilate)

Stanford: Morning Service in B flat Op.10 (Te Deum, Benedictus & Jubilate)

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Choral leaflet

£3.75

Publisher: RSCM Press
ISBN: C1067
StanfordÔÇÖs setting of the Morning Service in B flat was composed in 1879 as part of his Morning, Communion and Evening Service Op. 10 and was written for use in Trinity College Chapel, Cambridge where Stanford had been organist since 1873 and where the choir, of boys and men, was expanding under his directorship. The Service was published by Novello in the same year. According to Trinity CollegeÔÇÖs surviving chapel music lists, the Te Deum and Jubilate were first sung in Trinity Chapel at Mattins on 25 May 1879 (the Sunday after Ascension) and the Benedictus (with the Te Deum) at Mattins on Sunday (St Bartholomew) 24 August 1879 during the Long Vacation. The Morning part of StanfordÔÇÖs service was written to comply with the 1662 Book of Common Prayer. During the deliberations for the music for the Coronation of Edward VII in 1902 it was discovered that StanfordÔÇÖs name had been omitted from the list of those asked to provide musical items for the service. Close to the event, Walter Parratt, acting in his capacity as Master of the KingÔÇÖs Musick, asked Stanford if he could provide a setting of the Te Deum for the end (see Jeremy Dibble, Charles Villiers Stanford: Man and Musician (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2002), 338-9). In response, and needing to act expediently, Stanford elected to orchestrate his Te Deum in B flat, appending a short fanfare of seven bars at the beginning; this orchestration (without the initial fanfare) was published by Novello in 1903 along with the rest of the service. As a footnote to his service, the composer explained that, in the Te Deum, Credo and Gloria, he had ÔÇÿmade use of Gregorian Intonations as well as of the Amen according to the Dresden use.ÔÇÖ The latter appears, in numerous guises, throughout the whole service.