Page 62 - Chorister's Companion
P. 62

                                                                  Musical skills and understanding
tonic or home note (Doh). However, a major scale (whatever key it is written in) always has the same pattern of notes – the distance (or interval) between each note of the scale is always the same. A major scale has the following pattern of tones (whole steps) and semitones (half steps):
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If you started the scale on a note other than C, you would find that in order to keep the same pattern of tones and semitones, you would need to alter certain notes. For example, if you start on the note G, you would need to raise the seventh note to an F# in order to make sure that there was a whole tone between the sixth and seventh note, and a semitone between the seventh and eighth note:
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If you are singing a piece of music in the key of G, instead of seeing a # sign in front of every note F in the piece, the sign is usually put at the beginning of the stave – this tells you that every F you see should be raised by a semitone and sung or played as an F#. This is known as the key signature.
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