Page 23 - Voice for Life Yellow Workbook
P. 23

                                 Double sharps and double flats
i
This sign is a double sharp. It means that the note following it is made two semitones higher.
F
Double flat
F double sharp is two semitones higher than F – so it is the same pitch as G.
S
Double sharp
This sign is a double flat. It means that the note following it is made two semitones lower.
  
F double sharp
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       
than B – so it is the same pitch as A.
B double flat
B double flat is two semitones lower
      Double sharps (or double flats) are normally used in music which already has several sharps (or flats) in its key signature, and where the composer wishes to sharpen (or flatten) a note still further. Using double sharps or flats instead of their equivalent naturals is a way of ‘spelling’ the music.
For example, the words ‘flour’ and ‘flower’ sound the same, but have different meanings. In the same way, a composer can express the same pitch by ‘spelling’ it in different ways in different contexts – such as a note’s position in a scale, how it fits in a chord or melody and so on.
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
   Put a clef on this staff, and then write the note E double flat.
What is another name for E double flat?
    Write G double sharp on this staff.
What is another name for G double sharp?
How many semitones are there between G double sharp and B natural?
 
         Module B: Musical skills and understanding 23
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