Page 29 - Voice for Life Yellow Workbook
P. 29

                                 Chord inversions and voicings
i
If a chord has the root at the bottom, we say it is in root position. It doesn’t matter how many notes are in the chord, whether any notes are used twice, whether the notes are high or low, or which note is at the top. Here is a C major triad:
If a chord has the third at the bottom, it is in first inversion. If it has its fifth at the bottom, it is in second inversion.
  
In first inversion In second inversion (third at the bottom) (fifth at the bottom)
       In root position (root at the bottom)
      
          i The notes can be doubled (used twice at
The notes of a chord can be arranged in many different ways. The arrangement of
 notes in chords is called voicing. The E minor chords below are both in root position,
but they have different voicings.
       Root different octaves). In this example, the         Third
 
 

   root is doubled at the top and bottom of the chord.
The notes can be spread out. In this example the root is a low bass note, the third is in the middle, and the fifth very high in the treble register. This is called open position. A chord where the notes are as close together as possible is in close or closed position.
 


Fifth Root
         Fifth

       Third
Root
         
 
       Here is a chord of D
major. Is it in root   position, first inversion
or second inversion?

        Write a clef on this staff, then the key signature of A major. Write the tonic chord of A major in root position, then the same chord in second inversion.
    Write a clef on this staff, then the key signature of B flat major. Write the tonic chord of B flat major in first inversion.
  Module B: Musical skills and understanding 29
































































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