Page 33 - Voice for Life Yellow Workbook
P. 33

                                 Modes
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Some music is not in a major or minor key, but based on special scales called modes. There are several different modes. Each has its own pattern of tones and semitones which give it its own sound. Modal music sounds neither strictly major nor minor.
Some early church music, called plainchant or plainsong, is written in modes, as are many traditional songs. If you know any music in these styles, sing it with your choir. If not, listen to a recording. Ask your choir trainer for suggestions.
  Here are five of the most common modes, with their interval patterns of tones (shown with a T) and semitones (shown with an S). You can play them on the white keys of a keyboard, and this is how they are shown below. But a mode can start on any note as long as the interval pattern of tones and semitones is correct.
 The Dorian mode has the same interval pattern as the white notes on a keyboard from D to D.
The Phrygian mode has the same interval pattern as the white notes on a keyboard from E to E.
The Lydian mode has the same interval pattern as the white notes on a keyboard from F to F.
The Mixolydian mode has the same interval pattern as the white notes on a keyboard from G to G.
The Aeolian mode has the same interval pattern as the white notes on a keyboard from A to A.
 
 TSTTT S T
 
 
      STTT S T T
 
 
      TTTSTTS
 
 
      TTSTTST
 
           T S T T S T T
 
Sing or play these modes, up and down an octave. Listen to their different sounds.
  In the treble clef, write one octave of a Dorian mode, starting on C. You will need some accidentals.
In the bass clef, write one octave of a Phrygian mode, starting on A.
You will need some accidentals.
  
       Module B: Musical skills and understanding 33




































































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